The Beckett Blog


What you get signed is as important as the autograph itself by Chris Olds

By Chris Olds | Editor

For sports collectors where seemingly everything has been commodified, this is probably an obvious statement — but for the rest of the collecting world (or beginners) it might not be.

What you get autographed is as important as the autograph itself.

In the sports world, the type of item you get signed at a show or an appearance is often tied to the amount of money you’ll pay for the signature. Basically, the more valuable item you get signed the more you’ll typically have to pay. Why? The players, agents and show promoters know the relative value of an item, and, well, they want a relative cut.

Getting a jersey or another piece of equipment will cost you more than, say, a baseball card or a photograph. That’s just how it is with the business side of things. In fact, there are countless examples where players won’t sign certain items,  things showing them with certain teams or even certain brands of cards. (It’s not just a scene in Jerry Maguire.)

But the real value in a unique item is in the interest, the reaction, it should draw from those who see it. Some of my favorite autographed items in my collection — items I got signed in-person — were because they were unique items. They’re not the most expensive piece or the toughest autograph to land. They’re not ultra-rare, either, as a collector could conceivably re-create them with some legwork.

Then again, one of my most unique autographed items isn’t even a sports item at all — and that’s why you see a scene from a Quentin Tarantino movie, Death Proof, above where stuntwoman Zoë Bell is in action riding atop the hood of a 1970 Dodge Challenger as it speeds down a highway with another car in hot pursuit.

Read more … after the jump.

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Cardboard Tribute: The Late Leslie Nielsen by tolentinotown

By Andrew Tolentino | Assistant Editor

With only six cards in the Beckett database, the late Leslie Nielsen never hit the hobby as hard as he struck the universal funny bone. Taking hyperbolic leaps in humor, the frequently absurd actor died on Sunday, leaving a legacy of comedic characters and cult classics.

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Buster Posey’s memorable rookie season leads to surge in card prices & added interest in his autographs by Susan Lulgjuraj

By Susan Lulgjuraj | Contributing Editor

Buster Posey has had a memorable rookie year.

In his first full season behind the plate, the San Francisco Giants catcher was part of a world championship team. Come Monday, Posey could be named the National League Rookie of the Year.

Posey became one of the hottest sought-after baseball players the moment he was called up –  and prospectors jumped on his bandwagon long before he received he received full-time status as the Giants catcher. His baseball cards — and his autographs are in high demand, so much so he appears on the next cover of Beckett Sports Card Monthly.

Posey has 286 trading cards, including 116 autographs. According to Beckett.com, Posey’s prices have steadily climbed and took significant jumps when he was called up in late May, in late July when his talent was apparent, and again at the start of November when the rookie hit clean-up for the World Series champs.

His 2010 Upper Deck Rookie Card books at $25 and consistently sells for $20 and up on eBay.

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Steiner Sports offers unique items in company’s first catalogue auction by Susan Lulgjuraj

By Susan Lulgjuraj | Contributing Editor

Imagine sitting in a seat from the original Yankee Stadium while watching a baseball game in the comforts of your own home.

You can think about everything that seat witnessed as it was part of a history that spans back into the 1920s.

No, not one of those hard blue seats that makes you numb after sitting for two hours.

You could own a huge fielding replica glove couch that sits six to eight people. The couch is 86 inches high and 115 inches across.

Hope you have room for this thing.

Just for good measure, you will also get a Yogi Berra signed game-model glove.

This is one of the lots up for bidding in Steiner Sports Collectibles first catalog auction, which ends November 17 and 18. The items can be viewed at SteinerSports.com.

See more photos  from various auctions after the jump.

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King James bringing the Heat by Susan Lulgjuraj

By Susan Lulgjuraj | Contributing Editor

One of the biggest story lines coming into this NBA season was Lebron James in Miami after spending seven years with the team that drafted him.

In five games while wearing No. 6, James is averaging 20.4 points, 7.2 assists and 4.6 rebounds a game.

With a new team, collectors might have concerns on where they could get memorabilia that doesn’t say Cleveland Cavaliers, James’ former team.

Upper Deck Authenticated quickly took care of that.

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Two Days at The National: A Photo Gallery by Tracy Hackler

BALTIMORE — Following two and a half days immersed in the 31st National Sports Collectors Convention, I bittersweetly boarded a plane in Baltimore Friday afternoon to head back home. Bitter: I had to leave The National! Enough said. Sweet: I was mere hours away from reuniting with my sainted wife and two sons.

Not to worry: The ever-capable Chris Olds and a superstar slew of Beckett folks remained in Baltimore, as did an inordinate amount of personal highlights, including four maddeningly delicious crab cakes, quality time well spent with loyal Beckett customers, longtime friends and neat new ones.

I saw tons of cool autographed Tim Tebow memorabilia, but not nearly enough Tebow singles. I saw a bunch of excited collectors pulling some absolute cornerstone cards while participating in redemption programs for In The Game, the new Leaf, Panini America, Press Pass, Topps and Upper Deck. I saw a Brett Favre lookalike (Gary Williams from Kentucky) on Thursday morning, a walk-off Orioles victory from the cozy confines of Camden Yards on Thursday night (Tom and Mindy Noonan, you people are saints),  and enough cool Babe Ruth memorabilia to last until, well, at least a year — until the 32nd National in Chicago.

Heck, I even signed a few autographs (no, really, I did) and made an appearance on the Card Corner Club radio show. Indeed, I left Baltimore with tons of great memories — and an iPhone full of photos . . .

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Panini’s World Cup Soccer Stickers Make a Lasting Impression by Tracy Hackler

There was a time – like February – when I could’ve crammed everything I knew about soccer on the back of one of those little officially licensed Panini World Cup stickers. (And there would’ve been plenty of room left to also jot down . . . oh, I don’t know . . . perhaps the complete history of the Brazilian national team.)

So imagine my surprise-treading-on-euphoria last week when I discovered my face on the front of one of those little officially licensed Panini World Cup stickers. Actually, my face was on 15 of them, tucked magnificently inside an altered Panini World Cup sticker album.

There were 12 affixed to a sheet, one already placed on the first page of the album, one inserted into the pack of stickers on the front of the album and one secured safely in an inch-thick brick of Lucite. And this was my reaction: “. . .”

Indeed, I was speechless. I mean, come on – how would you react to unexpectedly seeing your very own collectible sticker for the first time? I must have gazed longingly at that sheet of me for 20 solid minutes – like Narcissus at his own image in the reflecting pool – until I came to one stark realization: I need a haircut. More sticker albums wouldn’t hurt, either.

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