The Beckett Blog


What you get signed is as important as the autograph itself by Chris Olds

By Chris Olds | Editor

For sports collectors where seemingly everything has been commodified, this is probably an obvious statement — but for the rest of the collecting world (or beginners) it might not be.

What you get autographed is as important as the autograph itself.

In the sports world, the type of item you get signed at a show or an appearance is often tied to the amount of money you’ll pay for the signature. Basically, the more valuable item you get signed the more you’ll typically have to pay. Why? The players, agents and show promoters know the relative value of an item, and, well, they want a relative cut.

Getting a jersey or another piece of equipment will cost you more than, say, a baseball card or a photograph. That’s just how it is with the business side of things. In fact, there are countless examples where players won’t sign certain items,  things showing them with certain teams or even certain brands of cards. (It’s not just a scene in Jerry Maguire.)

But the real value in a unique item is in the interest, the reaction, it should draw from those who see it. Some of my favorite autographed items in my collection — items I got signed in-person — were because they were unique items. They’re not the most expensive piece or the toughest autograph to land. They’re not ultra-rare, either, as a collector could conceivably re-create them with some legwork.

Then again, one of my most unique autographed items isn’t even a sports item at all — and that’s why you see a scene from a Quentin Tarantino movie, Death Proof, above where stuntwoman Zoë Bell is in action riding atop the hood of a 1970 Dodge Challenger as it speeds down a highway with another car in hot pursuit.

Read more … after the jump.

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Kill Bill star David Carradine dead at 72 by Chris Olds

carradine

David Carradine, the star of Kill Bill as well as the the 1970s television series Kung Fu, was found dead Thursday in a Thailand hotel — an apparent suicide according to one published report.

The 72-year-old actor’s collectibles resume includes autographed cards in the 2000 Charmed Season 1 set as well as the 2004 Alias Season 3 set, both from Inkworks. The Charmed card sells for approximately $30.

Donruss Americana, which arrived in hobby shops on Wednesday, includes Carradine’s largest assortment of trading cards, including the one above (numbered to 100) that we pulled from a review box last week.

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